Testosterone production in the body

4. Through a complex process that I’m not even going to attempt to describe, our testicles’ Leydig cells convert  cholesterol  into testosterone. That’s right, cholesterol is the building block of testosterone. Leydig cells get most of what they need to produce T by simply absorbing the cholesterol floating around in our blood from the bacon and eggs we ate in the morning. If there’s not enough cholesterol in our blood, our testicles can produce a bit of it so that the Leydig cells can convert it to testosterone. But relying too much on cholesterol produced by our nuts (of the non-almond variety) can actually inhibit our Leydig cells from producing T . You gotta eat those eggs!

In patients suffering from chronic renal failure (a condition linked to significantly depleted zinc levels) mega-dosing with 250mg/day of zinc was – as to be expected – able to significantly increase serum zinc, testosterone, and LH levels . Another study consisting of 37 infertile-subjects had the men take an undisclosed amount of zinc for 6-months and noted that the men who had testosterone levels on the lower end (less than 480 ng/dL) noticed significant improvements in testosterone and DHT levels, whereas the men on the higher levels of testosterone (more than 480 ng/dL) noted no increases in testosterone, but still significant increases in DHT levels. On an even more positive note, Nine of the subjects were able to conceive a child during the study period.

Testosterone production in the body

testosterone production in the body

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