Testosterone articles

Testosterone is a hormone produced in the male testes. During a boy's pubescent years (ages 9 to 14), there is an increase in production that leads to male secondary sexual characteristics such as a deeper voice, more muscle mass, facial hair growth and enlargement of the Adam's apple (among others). Some teenage boys experience these puberty changes at later ages than others. The timing of puberty is often genetically determined (through heredity), but other factors can play a role in delaying it, such as poor nutrition, physical trauma and certain diseases. Stimulating testosterone production naturally is possible in teen boys, although in rare cases hormone therapy may be needed to trigger and complete puberty.

On the other hand, men never had adverse consequences of making a wrong choice. The more children they produced, the higher was their chance to pass their genes to future generations, as some of them would certainly survive. While men were determined to seek better genes too, they had to grab all chances to procreate coming their way to ensure their genes would be passed forward. The men that ONLY stuck with one woman (even a high quality woman) were losing genetically to the men that used all of their opportunities and had many more children that survived. Those children were carrying their father's promiscuous genes, and this is why those male genes were passed to us.

Meta-analyses of placebo-controlled trials suggest that testosterone therapy in physiological doses is significantly associated with increased haematocrit, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and prostatic symptoms. 29 , 30 If prostate cancer has been excluded, there appears to be no increased risk of induction by testosterone therapy. There is inconsistent evidence regarding the risk of cardiovascular events. 29-31 A recent meta-analysis suggested increased cardiovascular risk and reported publication biases. 32 Long-term safety data are lacking, but recent reports more strongly suggest an increased risk of cardiovascular events in older men. 3 , 4 This has prompted the Endocrine Society to issue a warning statement. 5 The results and safety of long-term prospective controlled trials of testosterone therapy are awaited.

Since I read an article stating that taking zinc supplement can raise your PSA number I have stopped taking it because my PSA score DID get elevated. I am 77 with a PSA of 18,9 at last reading and have adamantly refused to give a prostate biopsy sample because it will compromise my prostate. The urologist then offered me a 'phi(?) test" requiring a blood sample. The result showed I had a 33% chance of prostate cancer. I'll take those odds. He gave me a digital exam and said the left side of the prostate was hard while the right side was soft. He did not elaborate further and ended my visit. I have noticed that there is no semen when I orgasm with my wife. Is that normal at my age?

Testosterone articles

testosterone articles

Since I read an article stating that taking zinc supplement can raise your PSA number I have stopped taking it because my PSA score DID get elevated. I am 77 with a PSA of 18,9 at last reading and have adamantly refused to give a prostate biopsy sample because it will compromise my prostate. The urologist then offered me a 'phi(?) test" requiring a blood sample. The result showed I had a 33% chance of prostate cancer. I'll take those odds. He gave me a digital exam and said the left side of the prostate was hard while the right side was soft. He did not elaborate further and ended my visit. I have noticed that there is no semen when I orgasm with my wife. Is that normal at my age?

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