Male hormone deficiency symptoms

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. [1] The prostate is a walnut-sized gland behind the base of a man’s penis and below the urinary bladder. Its function is to make seminal fluid, which is the liquid in semen that protects, supports, and helps transport sperm. [2] Once you understand the risk factors of prostate cancer, you can undergo tests, implement lifestyle changes, or take medications or supplements to help reduce your risk of prostate cancer.

  • HIV AIDS
  • Testicular injury
  • Kidney failure
  • Kallman’s syndrome
  • Inflammation of lungs
  • Poor functioning of liver
  • Stress and drug addiction
  • Over consumption of iron
  • Malfunctioning of pituitary gland
  • Excessive consumption of alcohol
  • Genetic disorders (Klinefelter’s Syndrome)
  • Cancer treatment (chemotherapy and radiation)

There is considerable controversy over the earliest age at which it is clinically, morally, and legally safe to use GnRH analogues, and for how long. The sixth edition of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health 's Standards of Care permit it from Tanner stage 2 but do not allow the addition of hormones until age 16, which could be five or more years later. Sex steroids have important functions in addition to their role in puberty, and some skeletal changes (such as increased height) that may be considered masculine are not hindered by GnRH analogues.

Do not consider WebMD User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.

Alkaline phosphatase, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and creatinine may vary depending on the patient's current sex hormone configuration. Several factors contribute to these differences, bone mass, muscle mass, number of myocytes, presence or lack of menstruation, and erythropoetic effect of testosterone. Many transgender men do not menstruate, and those with male-range testosterone levels will experience an erythropoetic effect. As such an amenorrheic transgender man taking testosterone, registered as female and with hemoglobin/hematocrit in the range between the male and female lower limits of normal, may be considered to have anemia, even though the lab report may not indicate so. Conversely, the lack of menstruation, and presence of exogenous testosterone make it reasonable to use the male-range upper limit of normal for hemoglobin/hematocrit. Using the male-range upper limit of normal for alkaline phosphatase and creatinine may also be appropriate for transgender men due to increased bone and muscle mass, respectively. In these cases the provider should reference the male normal ranges for their lab.[19]

Male hormone deficiency symptoms

male hormone deficiency symptoms

Do not consider WebMD User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.

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