Fluphenazine decanoate nursing considerations

Q. How do you differentiate between fluorosis and caries? Both appear as white spots on the teeth, so clinically how do you differentiate between them? I know it has something to do with their appearance while wet and dry, but I am not sure what? please help me I can't find this in any book. A. Only mild fluorosis is seen as white stop lesion on the tooth. It usually comes with brown spots. Look for them. Another method is trying to stick a dental explorer into it (not the Microsoft one- it’ll only be a portal for viruses..) and because caries is demineralized area it will feel kind of sticky. But I wouldn’t do that…it can harm the teeth. Another way is by an x ray. Fluorosis- you will see it as a whiter spot. Caries- a more translucent spot.

Side effects that may go away during treatment, include drowsiness, dizziness, nasal congestion, blurred vision, dry mouth, or constipation. If they continue or are bothersome, check with your doctor. CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR AS SOON AS POSSIBLE if you experience changes in vision; changes in breasts; changes in menstrual period; sore throat; inability to move eyes; muscle spasms of face, neck, or back; difficulty swallowing; mask-like face; tremors of hands; restlessness; tension in legs; shuffling walk or stiff arms or legs; puffing of cheeks; lip smacking or puckering; twitching or twisting movements; or weakness of arms or legs.

Fluphenazine decanoate nursing considerations

fluphenazine decanoate nursing considerations

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